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20110701
20110731
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
is very much in britain. >> there's no shortage of people in the american media establishment and the american political establishment who have taken issue with the fact that the properties, fox news and the "new york post" have done business. that said, we've got to be careful. usually you don't want to get ahead of yourselves. in this one the story has each time surpassed your wildest expectations in the past two weeks. >> happened again this morning. >> absolutely right. i would say in terms of the american implications there's a question of whether british journalists for news corp broke the law here in 9/11. the evidence is scant. if the attorney general were to issue a wider ranging investigations, even actions that were illegal taken, for example, in great britain could reflect on the ability of news corp to hold on to american broadcasting licenses here. you could see repercussions under the question of the they interpreted as foreign officials being bribed as has been alleged with some substantive hearings. >> once you start an investigation, your don't know what kind
are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: the phone hacking scandal in britain came full comes full circle today, with word that the "news of the world" tabloid will cease to publish after 168 years in business. margaret warner has the story. >> warner: the news electrified britain-- sunday's edition of "news of the world"-- the most widely read english language newspaper in the world-- will be its last. in sun valley, idaho today, media mogul rupert murdoch-- owner of parent company news corporation-- had no comment on the tabloid's closure. but his son james murdoch said in a statement to staffers: fundamentally, action taken a number of years ago by certain individuals, in what had been a good newsroom have breached the trust that the news of the world has with its readers. >> warner: those mistakes first came to light in 2005 when "news of the world" was accused of hacking into cell phone messages of members of the royal family and famous actors. other revelations followed, amid an ongoing but fitful police inquiry. this week, public outrage exploded with le
company. news corp. saying lots of tabloids in britain engaged in all sorts of outrageous behavior. you have rupert murdoch saying this is the most humble day of his life. which will we believe? that he and management are sorry or this is being made too much of by the rest of the press? >> it's a great question, howie. i've spoken about this before. you have here a real problem. i believe rupert is sincerely, sincerely appalled and sorry that in the case of mill lee dowler which is really what brought this scandal about when it was revealed that a teenage girl's phone was tampered with in order to sell newspapers because readers might think she was still alive. >> are the critics going overboard as the "wall street journal" editorial suggests? i have only a few seconds here. >> the "wall street journal" had the right to say that i think because there are plenty of other stories in your own country, watergate, the pentagon papers, and in england the daily telegraph two years ago paid for stolen records to expose mp's stolen expenses. there is a certain complicitness in britain and here t
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)